CENTRE
           
Départments
Eure et Loire Loiret Loire et Cher Indre et Loire Cher Indre
 
 

Indre-et-Loire
Commune
Bueil-en-Touraine   Chinon La Guerche  Langeais   Loche   Montrésor
 Rivière  St-Paterne-Racan   Tavant  Tours    Ussé
 
Chinon - Chapelle Sainte-Radegond
This chapel is cut into the rock face and is quite a long, hard walk along a track going steeply uphill from the old town, with a not picturesque view of the new town below. The chapel is said to contain the 19th century cenotaph and effigy of Jean de Chinon, also called Jean de Moûtler or Jean le Recluse (ob 6th century).  Of special interest are the medieval wall paintings. Wear sensible shoes! Opening times are limited so it is best to check with the tourist office.. There is an entrance fee of €3.00 (2012). Free parking on the edge of town near the castle from where the old town can been reached by a lift if the steep walk down deters you.

Easter - June 30th and September: Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays only, 3.00pm-6.00pm
July and August: Daily - except Tuesdays - 3.00pm-6.00pm

Langeais
A 15th century stone effigy of unknown type is reported here but I have been unable to find it. It is not in the central church of St-Jean-Baptiste (open during normal hours), unless it is in the locked crypt. (Left). There is another church a short walk from the town centre - church of St Laurent, but this is locked and I was not able to gain entry. (Right) Nor have I been able to discover further details of this church. Free parking in the town.
Loches   -  Collegiate Church of St Ours
Church open during normal hours follow the signs to the Church or Logis Royal or Chȃteau not the nearby Donjon.  Parking nearby is free. Well worth a visit not only to see this beautiful effigy but also the town itself. Please note that the monument was, although originally in the church, for a long period in the Logis Royal until being moved in recent times back into the church; some guide books may give an incorrect location. Ref: 47° 08' N / 1° 00' E




The beautiful effigy and tomb of Agnes Sorel, mistress of Charles VII (Joan of Arc's Dauphin) has now been returned to the church where it was orginally situated, having been for many years housed in the neaby Logis Royal. She died at the early age of twenty-right and a portrait of her, with one breast bare, may been seen in that latter building. Note that her feet rest on two lambs, a rebus of her Christian name; agneau being French for lamb. For details of Agnes's recently examined skeleton click here.
     


   
 
Bueil - en - Touraine
Parish Church of St-Pierre-aux-Liens
/ Collegiate Church of St-Michel-et-Sts-Innocents

Very welcoming churches, open normal hours: one connects to the other. Well signposted. Park in village, which is well worth a detour. The parish church is linked via a door (seen in first photograph on the right) to the collegiate church, which was built to contain the tombs of the lords of Bueil. . The four effigies lie in niches in the wall, three of which can be seen in the second photograph on the right
Ref: 47° 38.7' N / 0°  33.1' E
.


Jeanne de Montejean (1459), 1st Wife of Jean V de Bueil. (ref:: 303/XVIII; p.122;pl.56).  Note her head dress and arms in relief carved on her gown.


Martine Turpin, 2nd Wife of Jean V de Bueil. This effigy was originally in the now destroyed chapel of the nearby château of Plessis-Barte and moved here in 1850. Note the gablette, the unusual position of the arms,  long hair and  bare feet.



Marguerite de la Chausade (1443) & below Pierre de Bueil (1414) These effigies were originally side by side on a tomb chest, now destroyed.
      

 
Rivière - Église Notre-Dame
The church and the village on the banks of the Vienne are well worth a visit: a short detour from the road between Chinon and Loche. The church is unusual, being almost completely surrounded by buildings; however there is a court yard in from of the west end of the church with free parking. The church is open daily during daylight hours. In the 19th century the church interior was painted in what was belived to be a medieval fashion; this is quite effective and very pleasant. The monuments are in the crypt. Ref: 47° 09' N / 0° 17' E










Left and above: Unknown knight and lady, limestone, 16th century




Above: Incised slab which can just be seen at the base of the tomb chest, to the left. It reads: Dame De Bacher who died 12th April 1683
 
Montrésor - Collégiale Saint-Jean-Baptist   
The church was built in the middle of the 16th C, being consecrated in 1532, by Ymbert de Bastarnay, Lord of Montrésor, as a family mausoleum. The monument we see today is of Ymbert de Bastarnay (1523), his wife Georgette de Monchenu (1511) and their son François (1513).  It originally stood over the burial vault  in the centre of the church but was broken and ejected during the French Revolution in 1793; the church was restored in 1875 when the reassembled  monument was resited at the west end of the church,  now the parish church. The resoration of the alabaster monument was under the direction of  Parisian architect Fransçois Roguet and by the sculptor Michel Brueil. The original parish church is nearby and now a private house.
The church is open during daylight hours and parking is free in the street nearby. Ref: 47° 09' N / 1° 12' E
   
   
Beaulieu-Lés-Loches
Fulk Nerra, Count of Anjou, founded a Benedictine monastery here in 1007. The church was destroyed and rebuilt many times; the western part is in a semi-ruinous state but the east is restored and now the parish church. He died in 1040 and on the left is his coffin lid, set under glass below the church's modern floor. A later effigy, now lost, may have existed.
St-Paterne-Racan 
  Abbaye de la Clarté Dieu
 
 
A tourist information board in Buile-en-Touraine promised that there was a very fine military effigy here, supposed to be that of Jehane d'Alluye (1248). A notice on one of the entrance gate posts stated 'Private Property' and one on the other was the telephone number to arrange visits but this no longer functioned. However, wandering in, we received a very warm welcome from the owners. There is very little remaining above ground of the actual church but much of some of the conventual buildings remain and some of these are used for exhibitions. The promised military effigy is now permanently on display in the Cloisters Museum, New York. However we were shown the incised slab (above) which is unfortunately fractured and defaced. The feet of a military effigy can just be made out and there are remains of an inscription. Ref: 47° 36' N / 0° 28' E
Tony Carr has kindly provided a photograph of the effigy, now in the USA

Tavant - Church of St-Nicholas
There is a small free car park near the church. The opening hours are restricted (see below); entry is free but there is a small charge (€3.00 - 2012) for regular guided tours of the crypt to see the medieval wall paintings. The effigy, however, is in the north transept. Ref: 47° 07' N / 0° 23' E
The church is open from 10.00 am-12.30 pm and 2.15 pm-6.00 pm on the following days:
April to September
March, October and November
December and January
February
From Wednesday to Sunday
From Monday to Friday
Possible to visit Monday to Thursday
Closed
It is advisable to check these somewhat complicated opening times (which are posted on the church door)  at the town hall or possibly the tourist office in Chinon
Jehan de Guydier (1564), Curé of Tavant. The effigy was found in the church yard and has been sited in the church since 1970. The inscription reads: 'CI GIT VENERABLE ET DISCRET [illegible] SIRE JEHAN GUYDIER CURE DE TAVA... TRESPASSA LE XX JOUR DE MARS 15[6]4'

Candes-St-Martin
Free car park in the village
St Martin - a Roman soldier who converted to Christianity - founded a church here and later became Bishop of Tours; he died here in 397 and was buried in his cathedral. The present church is 12th -15th century. There are two modern effigies of St Martin - one rests on a tomb chest, showing him in his pontifical robes and the other as a monk, below the altar. Both are in St Martin's chapel at the NE end of the church
 
Ussé
This 15th century effigy of an unknown  lady was originally in the Abbey of Turpeny but is now housed in the private chapel of the Chȃteau of Ussé.
Parking in the village is free and you may visit the chȃteau - which is privately owned - as well as the chapel in the grounds but the cost is relatively high.


 
Tours
There's an excellent train service from Paris; I have not tried parking here but probably similar to Angers
The Cathedral
Ref: 47° 24' N / 0° 42' E
Above: Children of Charles VIII & Anne of Brittany: Charles-Orland (1492-1495) and Charles (1496). Note the baby and young child. Carrera marble by Jérôme de Fiésole. Italian style but the effigies are in the Medieval tradition of Michel Colombe. The monument was in the Basilica of St Martin from 1506 and moved to the Cathedral in 1834.

Right: Michel-Jean Amelot (1724) Diplomat; Conseillier d'Etat to Louis IV. He was the nephew of Archbishop Michel Amelot de Gournay

 

A Series of Monuments to the Archbishops of Tours of the 19th and 20th Centuries
Felix Pierre Fruchard (1874) Charles-Théodore Colet (1883) By architect Marcel Lambert and sculptors Pierre Damien and Louis Nöel.
CI GIT CHARLES THEODORE COLET, ARCHEVEQUE DE LUCHON PUIS DE TOURS, MORTE LE 19 NOVENBRE 1883 A L'AGE 77 ANS
René François Renou (1913) By sculptor Georges Delperier.
HIC QUIESCAT IN D[OMIN]O PATER D D RENATUS FRANCISCUS RENOU QUI BURGOLII NATUS VITAM CARITATE REFERTAM COMPLEVIT PATRIAE BENEMERITUS EPISCOPUS AMBIANESIS ANNIS III DEHIND ARCHIEPISCOPUS TURONENSIS SOLIO PONTIFICIO ASSISTENS POST ANNOS XVII LABORE FRACTUS ONUS DEPOSUIT VI SUPERSTAS OBIIT KAL MARTII MCMXX AETSTIS SUAE LXXVI CLERUS POPULUSQUE DIOCESIS TURON[UM] GRATI POSUERE
Far left: Jean-Baptiste du Chilleau (1824);  Near left: Augustin Louis de Montblanc (1841)
Albert Negre (1931) Ludovic Gaillard (1956) Louis Ferrand (1980) Michel Moutel (1998)
Basilica of St Martin
Ref: 47° 23' N / 0° 41' E
There have been several churches on this site over the grave of St Martin. Only towers of the medieval church now remain, other parts of the building having been demolished in the Revolution and later. A new Neo-Bazantine basilica was erected over the grave of St Martin 1888-1924 by Guillaune René Meigan, Archbishop of Tours, whose monument in the crypt is shown to the right. Above  is the structure built over St Martin's grave, also in the crypt.

Loire-et-Cher
Commune
Chaon Coutre-sur-Loir Lassay-sur-Croisne

Chaon - Église Saint-Pierre
Church is open. Park in square (free) outside the church.
The church is mentioned in 1148 as a dependence of a priory founded by monks from the abbey of Ferrières-en-Gâtinais (see below, Loiret). It was partly destroyed in 1570 by religious reformers and rebuilt at the end of the 16th century. It was remodelled in 1806 and 1884 Ref: 47° 37' N / 2° 11' E
The lists mention a gisant of a bishop, presumably saved from the original church; gisant refers to a tomb effigy, usually a recumbent one. This minature of a bishop, which retains some of the original polychrome, shows him wearing a mitre and a loin cloth. Although he rests on a slab, he stands on a platfrom and the position of his legs suggests that he was originally standing. Although he may well have been part of a tomb, I suggest he was probably standing in a niche.

Couture-sur-Loir
Unusually this church does not have a dedication; it is open 9.00 am to 5.00 pm November to March and 9.00 am to 7.00 pm April to October. Park in the small car park to one side of the church: near the tree in the photograph. The tomb is at the back of the church and to your left as you enter; it is surrounded by modern iron railing and tucked partly under a wooden staircase.
Ref: 47° 45' N / 0° 41' E


Effigies of Louis de Ronsard, knight and Jeanne de Chauldrier. 16th century. They were the parents of the poet Pierre de Ronsard

  Lassay-sur-Croisne - Église Saint-Hilaire   
The church is locked but the telephone number of the key holder is given on the door; she was only too happy to open the church for us and was very helpful. You can park in the space outside the church; take care not to block gates Ref: 47° 22' N / 1° 37' E

 
 
   
     
Badly damaged limestone monument of Philippe de Moulin (1506); some original polychrome. His ancestral seat Château de Moulin is situated in the village. An epitaph is carved on the top of the slab all around the effigy; this is transcribed below.
CI GIST LE [COEUR] DE NOBLE ET PUISSA[N]T  SIEUR MESSIRE PHLS DU MOLI[N] EN SO[N] VIVA[N]T CHER ET SIEUR DU LIEU CO[N]SEILLER ET CHA[M]BELLAM
ORDI[N]AIRE DU ROY CAPPITAINE DE XL LA[N]CES DES ORDONNA[N]CES DU DIT SE[I]GN[EU]R ET FO[N]DAT[EU]R DE LEGLISE DE CEA[N]S Q[UI] TRESPASSA LE SAMEDI XII[E]ME SEPTE[M]BRE MIL V CENS ET VI PRIER DIEU PO[UR] LUI.


 

Loiret
Commune
Clery-Saint-André Ferrières-en-Gâtinais Montargis Saint-Benôit-sur-Loire
 
Cléry-Saint-André - Collegiate Church of Our Lady
Church open during normal hours. Park in the free car park next to the church. Ref: 47° 49'N / 1° 45' E
King Louis XI 'The Universal Spider' (1483) Louis was one of the very few kings of France who wished to be buried elsewhere than St Denis.

A drawing from 1481 is still extant of the projected effigy and which shows the King kneeling but wearing armour and with shoulder length hair; this was perhaps based on an earlier design of 1472 by Jean Fouchet. This drawing probably differs from the final monuments constructed by Conrad of Cologne, goldsmith of Tours and Laurent Wrine, cannon maker, in gilt bronze and enamelled brass. This was melted down by the Hugenots in 1562.

The present effigy, sculptured in 1622 is the work of Michel Bourdin of Orleans, painter and architect of Paris, who constructed the monuments according to a design drawn by him in 1617.

This was destroyed in 1792 but the remains were collected by Alexandre Lenoir (who has been referred to in the section on St Denis) for display in his museum and reconstructed by the sculptor Besuvallet and the marbler Scellier. In 1818 the Prefect of the Loiret transferred the monument back to Cléry and a base was constructed by the architect Pagot and the sculptor Romagnesi. A drawing by an English visitor of this base - more in keeping than the present one - still exists.

During the restoration of the church in 1868 the tomb was again dismantled and in 1874 the effigy repositioned on a simple slab at ground level. It was replaced in 1896 on the present incongruous base which was constructed by the sculptor Libersac and the marbler Barberon.

The King and his Queen, Charlotte of Savoy, are buried in a vault which can be entered via a floor grill at the side of the monument; there their skulls may be seen displayed. Watch this space!
Above: The heart of Louis's son Charles VIII (1498) was also buried at Cléry; above left  is a stone mounted on the wall, which reproduces the inscription on the casket which contains the heart and, right, the stone above the actual burial vault. His monument at St Denis was destroyed at the Revolution.
Below Left: stone with simple cross and inscription, now mounted on wall.
Right: Stone on floor marking the burial of  the Breton Tanneguy du Chastel (1477 ) He was killed by cannon fire while leaning on the King's shoulder at the seige of Bouchain; he was buried here on Louis's request.
Ferrières-en-Gâtinais
Abbaye Saint-Pierre-et-Saint-Paul
Church open during normal hours. Park in the small free car park outside the entrance to the church, although there is plenty of parking elsewhere. Impossible to find anywhere to eat Saturday lunch time in this large village.
Ref: 48° 05' N / 2° 18' E

Tomb of Abbé Louis de Blanchefort (1505), who restored the church and revived the community following devastation by the English in the !00 Years' Way. The tomb is said to have had an effigy by, possibly, Jean Juste but this was destroyed in the 16th century; there is now no evidence of its existence.

Montargis - Musée Girodet
There is time limited paid parking in the street just outside the museum. The museum is closed at weekend so it is best to chech opening times before visiting: we didn't!
In the museum there is reported a terra cotta study for the monument to Albert of Saxe-Cobourg-Gotha, prince consort of Queen Victoria, in the Albert Memorial Chapel of St George's Chapel, Winsor, Berkshire. This was by the scuptor Henri de Triqueti 1871 but refused by Queen Victoria

St Benôit-sur-Loire - Abbey of Fleury
The abbey is a working monastry, staffed by Benedictine monks; in fact the remains of St Benedict are housed in a reliquary in  the crypt. The church is open from 6.00 am until 10.00 pm; there is no entrance fee and visitors may take photographs but  are politely asked not to do so during the offices of the day. Street parking near the abbey is unrestrcted. Ref: 47° 49' N / 2° 18' E
The town and the abbey are well worth a visit.
King Phillipe I ( 1108 ) He was king of France from the age of eight and during his reign there occured  both the Norman Conquest of England and the First Crusade. He was buried here before the high altar - one of the very few Franch kings not to have been buried at St Denis - but the effigy has moved positions over the years. The King did not take part in the First Crusade - although his brother did so - being under the sentence of excommunication  for contracting a bigamous marriage with Bertrande, the wife of the Duke of Anjou. He was known as Phillipe the Amorous.

Cher
Commune
Bourges Brignueuil La Celle Saint-Amand-Montrond



Eure-et-Loire
Commune
Dreux Lèves



Indre
Commune
Neuvy-Saint-Sepulchre



 

 

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